Reports

Trump’s doctor claims the president ‘reports no symptoms’ of COVID-19

  • White House physician Dr. Sean Conley said that President Donald Trump reported “no symptoms” of COVID-19 on Tuesday.
  • The statement comes less than 24 hours after Trump returned to the White House after being hospitalized at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center for three days.
  • Conley has been criticized for providing misleading information about Trump’s health since the president tested positive early Friday. 
  • Trump has resumed downplaying the coronavirus, claiming that he could be “immune” and urging Americans to not let the pandemic “dominate” their lives. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

White House physician Dr. Sean Conley announced on Tuesday that President Donald Trump claims to have “no symptoms” of coronavirus, less than a day after the president was released from a three-day stay at the hospital.

“This morning the President’s team of physicians met with him in the Residence,” Conley wrote in a brief memo. “He had a restful first night at home, and today he reports no symptoms.”

“Overall he continues to do extremely well, I will provide updates as we know more,” he added.

Trump spent the weekend and most of Monday at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland. Upon his return to the White House Monday evening, the president ascended a flight of stairs to a balcony, where he took off his mask as news cameras captured footage of him appearing to have difficulty breathing.

Trump wrote on Twitter early Friday moring that he and First Lady Melania Trump had tested positive. He then underwent a series of treatments to combat the infection, including at least two doses of supplemental oxygen and dexamethasone, a corticosteroid typically reserved for severe coronavirus cases. 

During the course of his illness, Trump’s doctors and White House officials have offered conflicting accounts about his condition, treatment,

High drug prices driven by profits, House committee reports find

Enormous drug company profits are the primary driver of soaring prescription drug prices in America, according to a damning investigation that Democrats on the House Oversight Committee began releasing Wednesday.

The first two reports in the investigation focus on Celgene and Bristol Myers Squibb’s Revlimid cancer treatment, the price of which has been raised 23 times since 2005, and Teva’s multiple sclerosis drug Copaxone, which has risen in price 27 times since 2007.

The costs have little to do with research and development or industry efforts to help people afford medication, as drug companies often claim, according to the inquiry.

“It’s true many of these pharmaceutical industries have come up with lifesaving and pain-relieving medications, but they’re killing us with the prices they charge,” Rep. Peter Welch, D-Vt., said as the hearings began Wednesday. He added, “Uninhibited pricing power has transformed America’s pain into pharma’s profit.”

The top Republican on the committee, James Comer of Kentucky, called the investigation a partisan attack. “These hearings seem designed simply to vilify and publicly shame pharmaceutical company executives,” Comer said.

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Much of the drug industry’s profits come at the expense of taxpayers and the Medicare program, say the reports, which say that they are used to pay generous executive bonuses and that they are guarded by aggressive lobbying and efforts to block competition, regulation or systemic change in the United States while the rest of the world pays less.

“The drug companies are bringing in tens of billions of dollars in revenues, making astronomical profits, and rewarding their executives with lavish compensation packages — all without any apparent limit on what they can charge,” committee chair Carolyn Maloney, D-N.Y., wrote in a letter attached to the first two staff reports.

Rep. Elijah Cummings,

House Reports Push for More Focus on China by Intelligence Agencies

WASHINGTON — The United States could fall behind in its global competition with China without additional resources to develop better intelligence on the Chinese government, and spy agencies must focus more on the challenge of pandemics and trade, according to a report by the Democrats on the House Intelligence Committee released Wednesday.

The warnings in the report, the result of a classified two-year study of American intelligence agencies’ work, were similar to the conclusions of a Republican study on China also released Wednesday. While that report, by a task force of House Republican lawmakers, has a wider focus, it too called for a more aggressive stance toward China and better defenses against Chinese theft of intellectual property and efforts to influence American politics.

While there is a bipartisan consensus on China, the failure of Democrats and Republicans in the House to work together on the issue was another sign of the partisan dysfunction that has gripped Washington and that could be a hurdle to revising American policy on China despite the agreement.

The House Intelligence Committee report, primarily the work of the panel’s Democratic majority, calls for a “significant realignment of resources” to help the United States compete with China. The report calls for a broader look at national security threats, including climate change and pandemics, while trying to collect intelligence on China.

“Absent a significant and immediate reprioritization and realignment of resources, we will be ill prepared to compete with China — diplomatically, economically and militarily — on the global stage for decades to come,” said Representative Adam B. Schiff, Democrat of California and the chairman of the committee. “The good news is that we still have time to adapt.”

China has been a growing challenge for the United States. President Trump has said without evidence that the coronavirus

Mnuchin reports movement on COVID-19 relief; House delays vote

By David Lawder and Susan Cornwell

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin on Wednesday said talks with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi made progress on COVID-19 relief legislation, and the House of Representatives postponed a vote on a $2.2 trillion Democratic coronavirus plan to allow more time for a bipartisan deal to come together.

Less than five weeks before the Nov. 3 presidential and congressional elections, Mnuchin and Pelosi both said negotiations would continue toward a bipartisan agreement to deliver aid to millions of Americans and businesses reeling from the coronavirus pandemic. The virus has infected more than 7.2 million people and killed over 206,000 in the United States.

“We made a lot of progress over the last few days. We still don’t have an agreement, but we have more work to do. And we’re going to see where we end up,” Mnuchin told reporters after meeting with Pelosi for about 90 minutes in the U.S. Capitol.

“We’ve made a lot of progress in a lot of areas,” he said.

For her part, Pelosi avoided use of the term “progress.”

“Secretary Mnuchin and I had an extensive conversation and we found areas where we are seeking further clarification. Our conversation will continue,” the top Democrat in Congress said in a statement.

She said the House would vote late on Wednesday on a $2.2 trillion updated Heroes Act “to formalize our proffer to Republicans in the negotiations to address the health and economic catastrophe in our country.”

But later Wednesday that vote was postponed until Thursday. Lawmakers are “giving one more day for a deal to come together,” a Democratic aide said, speaking on condition of anonymity.

Before the meeting in Pelosi’s office broke up, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, a Republican, told reporters that Republicans and Democrats were still

Congressional Reports Recommend Stiffer Response to China’s Rise

(Bloomberg) — The U.S. should re-examine all aspects of its relationship with China, including investment, trade, defense and intelligence capabilities, according to two separate reports issued Wednesday by congressional panels — one controlled by Democrats, the other by Republicans.



people walking in front of United States Capitol: A person runs past the U.S. Capitol building in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Friday, Aug. 7, 2020. Negotiations on a new coronavirus relief bill edged toward the brink of collapse after a meeting Thursday between White House officials and top congressional Democrats ended with each side accusing the other of being unwilling to compromise and the biggest issues far from resolved.


© Bloomberg
A person runs past the U.S. Capitol building in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Friday, Aug. 7, 2020. Negotiations on a new coronavirus relief bill edged toward the brink of collapse after a meeting Thursday between White House officials and top congressional Democrats ended with each side accusing the other of being unwilling to compromise and the biggest issues far from resolved.

Congressional GOP members urged key industries to shift supply chains away from China and called for stricter limits on some China-related investments, according to the final report from their China Task Force. The group, which Democrats declined to join, called China a “generational threat” akin to the Soviet Union during the Cold War.

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That panel also criticized the Chinese Communist Party for human rights violations and an early coronavirus response that relied on “coverups, arrests and blame-shifting, rather than transparency.”

“For decades, the United States and its allies have been asleep at the wheel,” said the tax force’s chairman, Michael McCaul, a Texas Republican. “Covid created an awakening experience for the American people and the sleeping giant has finally awoken.”

At the same time, a separate report released by the House Intelligence Committee found significant deficiencies in the U.S.’s intelligence capabilities when it comes to China and recommended overhauling the intelligence approach to the country. The panel is led by California Democrat Adam Schiff and includes members of both parties.

‘Expansive’ Analysis

“The widespread, if not yet fully understood, global impact of Covid-19 and other transnational events make this both an opportune and urgent moment to