restaurant

New upscale Stone Oak Mexican restaurant Cuishe Cocina Mexicana opening Tuesday in San Antonio from Toro Kitchen + Bar team

At special events and festivals around San Antonio the last few years, co-owner Gerardo De Anda of the popular Spanish restaurant Toro Kitchen + Bar has made no secret that the food of Mexico would be his next quest.

Tuesday, Oct. 6, that quest becomes a reality with the opening of Cuishe Cocina Mexicana in Stone Oak, just a few doors down from where he opened the first Toro in 2017. A second location of Cuishe is coming Nov. 3 in St. Paul Square near downtown, close to the second location of Toro, according to Cuishe’s Facebook page.

Named for an agave plant used to make mezcal, Cuishe (pronounced KWEE-sheh) will feature more than 150 bottles of spirits distilled from agave, including tequila, mezcal, sotol, raicilla and bacanora, served straight up or mixed in a wide variety of cocktails served not just in glasses, but also in clay cups, gourds and even hollowed-out jalapeños.

The kitchen, overseen by Toro executive chef Juan Carlos Bazan, will showcase food from Central Mexico, with familiar dishes like Wagyu steak arrachera, enchiladas, sopes, street tacos made from an al pastor trompo and wood-fired snapper and less-familiar specialties like huitlacoche quesadillas, ant-larvae “caviar” called escamoles, flame-roasted octopus and “bichos,” an assortment of toasted scorpions, grasshoppers and worms served with guacamole.

The elegant space is divided into rooms with rustic accents, such as Mexican vaquero gear and the farm implements used to harvest agave.


Cuishe Cocina Mexicana, in Stone Oak at 115 N Loop 1604 E Suite 1118, cuishemx.com. In St. Paul Square at 119 Heiman St. Stone Oak hours: noon-11 p.m. Tuesday through Thursday, noon-2 a.m. Friday and Saturday, noon-9 p.m. Sunday. A brunch and lunch combination menu will be served each day,

Eller’s Restaurant to close until Thursday after kitchen worker tests positive for COVID-19

Eller’s Restaurant in Leicester, Massachusetts, has announced it will close until Thursday after a kitchen worker tested positive for COVID-19.

The restaurant — located in the Cherry Valley neighborhood of the town just west of Worcester — announced the news Monday in a social media post.

“We have one kitchen employee that has tested positive for Covid” the restaurant wrote in a Facebook post. “He is asymptomatic and is still feeling well. No other staff are currently symptomatic.”

The restaurant says it reached the decision to close until Thursday after working with a Board of Health agent.

“This is not been asked of us, as all safety measures have been and are are being taken,” the restaurant says. “However, we would like to wait till all employees that worked with said employee, have been tested and are negative before returning to work for the safety of our team and our guests.”

According to Eller’s, the entire restaurant will be disinfected while closed. Upon reopening, employees will be temperature-checked before their shifts.

The Board of Health will be conducting a full inspection before reopening on Thursday at 4 p.m., the restaurant says.

On Sunday, Massachusetts reported 626 new COVID cases and three more coronavirus deaths. The total number of statewide cases now stands at 132,440.

The number of Massachusetts communities considered at “high risk” for coronavirus spread, according to the state’s latest COVID risk assessment map as of Sunday, has expanded to 23. Those towns and cities are Attleboro, Avon, Boston, Chelsea, Dracut, Everett, Framingham, Haverhill, Holliston, Lawrence, Lowell, Lynn, Lynnfield, Marlborough, Methuen, Middleton, Nantucket, New Bedford, North Andover, Revere, Springfield, Winthrop and Worcester.

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San Francisco’s Farmhouse Kitchen opens glitzy Thai restaurant in Menlo Park, indoor dining included | Peninsula Foodist | Elena Kadvany

San Francisco Thai restaurant Farmhouse Kitchen has opened a glitzy new location in Menlo Park, offering limited indoor and outdoor dining, takeout and delivery.

Farmhouse Kitchen has revamped the 4,000-square-foot space at 1165 Merrill St., across from the Caltrain station, decking it out with opulent decorations (including handmade gold Thai chandeliers and flower wall), a private dining room, a lounge area with velvet chairs and gleaming full bar. The restaurant opened barely a week after San Mateo County announced that indoor dining could resume at 25% capacity or with 100 people, whichever is fewer.


The ornate dining room at Farmhouse Kitchen in Menlo Park. Photo courtesy Farmhouse Kitchen.

But the “new normal guidelines” for dining in at Farmhouse Kitchen includes a health screening, temperature check, masks required when diners aren’t eating or drinking and parties of no more than six people with reservations capped at 90 minutes. The restaurant also charges a $3 “COVID-19 sanitation fee” per table.

Kasem Saengsawang, a native of Thailand, opened his first Farmhouse Kitchen in San Francisco in 2015. The restaurant was inspired by the food he ate and cooked growing up in Loei, a rural province in northeast Thailand, but he spent much of his adult years in Bangkok.

Saengsawang now runs five restaurants, including one in Portland, Oregon. He recently moved to Menlo Park so plans to be a frequent presence at this location.


A Farmhouse Kitche appetizer: sesame-crusted ahi tuna with cucumber, seaweed salad, lemongrass and spicy chili lime. Photo courtesy Farmhouse Kitchen.

Saengsawang describes his cooking style as “contemporary.” The Farmhouse Kitchen Menlo Park menu spans Northern and Southern Thailand, including dishes like pineapple fried rice, lobster pad thai, 24-hour beef noodle soup and slow-braised short rib served with panang curry, a dish the menu says is “reminiscent” of the large

A stone house built in the 1940s is now Colleyville’s newest neighborhood restaurant

A new spot is opening in Colleyville this week: Stone House Restaurant is serving up fresh-food-focused dinners. The new spot, which opened Monday, sits inside a 1940s stone house in Colleyville — hence the name.

Co-owners and Colleyville residents Paul and Lisa Pardo thought they had retired from the restaurant business before opening Stone House. Previously, they owned Coal Vines Pizza and Wine Bar in Southlake.

However, every time they drove by the stone house in Colleyville, Lisa said they were inspired.

“To us, it just kept saying ‘restaurant,'” she said.

A storm brews south east of Rooftop Cinema Club drive-in off Central Expressway in Dallas, Wednesday, Aug. 26, 2020. Catching a drive-in movie is one of our socially distanced date ideas.

And so they moved to open a restaurant and they’ve brought in two partners: a chef and general manager, both with previous careers at Del Frisco’s Restaurant Group.

Chef Thomas Dritsas was the corporate executive chef at Del Frisco’s Restaurant Group for more than 20 years, according to the restaurant’s website. Lisa Pardo said that the chef’s focus for the Stone House Restaurant menu has been on fresh food and ingredients.

Greg Kalina was formerly general manager for Del Frisco’s Restaurant Group in Fort Worth. Now, he’s part of the Stone House team as a partner and general manager.

Opening a restaurant in a pandemic proved a “blessing,” and Lisa said it gave them more time to prepare and the ability to move at a slower, more relaxed pace in the process.

With the menu focused on fresh fixings, Lisa brought attention to the variety of what they call “shareables,” with items like queso, hummus, oysters, shrimp, biscuits and more.

Their menu boasts a variety of steaks and chops, from a hand-cut filet mignon to lamb sirloin, and other entrees like shrimp and grits and “roasted 7 spice chicken.”

Lisa noted that one of their signature cocktails, The Boulevard, is named for the street the restaurant sits on: Colleyville

New Vietnamese restaurant is immigrant cook’s dream come true


Meet the family behind Yen’s Kitchen in suburban Lake Worth

Liz Balmaseda
 
| Palm Beach Post

Years before Manh Trac was born in Ho Chi Minh City, his mother performed at the local circus, balancing her petite frame upon spinning barrels. She had terrible motion sickness, but she also had six siblings to help feed. So if it took some daredevil stunts to accomplish that, so be it. 

When that wasn’t enough, Yen Nguyen learned to cook. She set up a lunch stand in an industrial neighborhood and sold steaming bowls of her homemade noodle soups to factory workers on break. Her long-simmered beef pho and pork-broth soups picked up a following. Soon she had a food cart to roll into the local zoo, where she could sell bags of homemade Vietnamese street snacks to visiting families. 

When her son was born, she moved the food enterprise to her front porch. At 25, Manh Trac tells that story as if he witnessed all of it himself, with details so vivid you can taste the chili oil in his mother’s popular spicy beef vermicelli bowls. 

He tells the story today from Yen’s Kitchen, the bright, month-old restaurant his mother opened in a suburban Lake Worth plaza that’s home to three churches, a pizzeria and a new-ish Asian market. Manh may be standing a world away from that front-porch stand of their native Vietnam, but the scents and flavors of their homeland surround him in the small, casual eatery. 

“Everything you see here is made by my mother,” says Manh, referring to the neat shelves of street snacks and spices his mom makes and packages. “We’re just her supporters.”

A hand-painted mural lights up a wall with a sign that translates to “Second Sister of Saigon” — it’s a popular Vietnamese movie