safety

White House to host ‘Fall Garden Tours’ this year, despite issues with health and safety

The White House is set to host “Fall Garden Tours” for lawmakers and the public this season to show off the newly renovated Rose Garden. 

The tours will be hosted Oct. 17 and Oct. 18, even after more than 20 staffers, journalists, allies of the administration and GOP lawmakers tested positive for coronavirus following contact with the White House. 

The tours are free and open to the public, but tickets are required. Visitors will be able to tour the South Lawn, First Ladies Garden, White House Kitchen Garden and Rose Garden.

Guest capacity is limited, and visitors are required to wear a face mask. Tickets will be offered to all congressional offices. 

President Trump and first lady Melania tested positive for COVID-19 last week, but White House physician Dr. Sean Conley announced the president will be able to return to public engagements this weekend. 

MCCONNELL HASN’T BEEN TO WHITE HOUSE SINCE EARLY AUGUST BECAUSE OF LAX COVID RULES 

“Saturday will be day 10 since Thursday’s diagnosis, and based on the trajectory of advanced diagnostics the team has been conducting, I fully anticipate the president’s safe return to public engagements at that time,” he said. 

Other White House staff who have tested positive for COVID-19 at this point include senior adviser Hope Hicks and director of Oval Office operations Nick Luna. Trump campaign manager Bill Stepien also tested positive.

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Former White House adviser Kellyanne Conway and White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany announced they tested positive this week, and former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, who helped Trump prep for the presidential debate, remains hospitalized from the virus. 

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Mitch McConnell admits he hasn’t been inside the White House in months for safety reasons

Mitch McConnell; Donald Trump; Covid Memorial Project
Mitch McConnell; Donald Trump; Covid Memorial Project

Mitch McConnell, Donald Trump and the Covid Memorial Project Photo illustration by Salon/Getty Images

With President Donald Trump and many of his Republican allies in the White House having been infected with COVID-19, many of his critics are warning that setting foot inside 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue could be a health threat. But one needn’t be a Trump critic to feel that way. None other than Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has, in essence, admitted that he hasn’t been inside the White House in two months because of the lack of social distancing precautions.

“I haven’t actually been to the White House since August the 6th,” McConnell said. “Because my impression was that their approach to how to handle this is different from mine and what I suggested that we do in the Senate, which is to wear a mask and practice social distancing.”

The remarks came at an event in Kentucky, streamed on Facebook.

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It was a striking admission, given that President Donald Trump has faced withering criticism for his failure to handle the pandemic in the United States, which has now killed more than 210,000 people. Critics have argued that the recent outbreak of cases at the White House, affecting many top officials including the president himself and which may have centered around the ceremony celebrating the nomination of Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court.

Other prominent Republicans who have recently tested positive for COVID-19, in addition to Trump, include long-time adviser Kellyanne Conway, White House Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany, Senior Adviser Stephen Miller, Bill Stepien (Trump’s campaign director), Republican National Committee Chair Ronna Romney McDaniel and former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, among others.

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State Farm teams up with Scarborough Fire Department to serve up kitchen safety

The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) and State Farm agent Michelle Raber are teaming up with the Scarborough Fire Department to support Fire Prevention Week, an annual public awareness campaign promoting home fire safety.

State Farm agents are delivering Fire Prevention Week toolkits to more than 2,500 fire departments across the country, including Scarborough. Each toolkit includes resources for Fire Prevention Week, taking place Oct. 4-10, including brochures, magnets, posters and more. The Fire Department will be sharing these resources with schools and communities this fall in support of the campaign.

This year’s Fire Prevention Week campaign, “Serve Up Fire Safety in the Kitchen” focuses on cooking fire safety. Home cooking fires represent the leading cause of all fires with nearly half – 49 percent – happening in the kitchen. Unattended cooking is the leading cause of these fires.

“The good news is that the majority of kitchen fires are highly preventable,” said State Farm agent Michelle Raber. “These great kits will help our fire departments spread the news to always stay focused when you’re in the kitchen and never leave the kitchen unattended.”

Key messages around this year’s Fire Prevention Week campaign will include the following:

• Keep a close eye on what you’re cooking; never leave cooking unattended

• Keep anything that can catch fire — oven mitts, wooden utensils, food packaging, towels or curtains — at least three feet away from your stovetop.

• Be on alert. If you are sleepy or have consumed alcohol, don’t use the stove or stovetop.

For more information about Fire Prevention Week and this year’s theme, “Serve Up Fire Safety in the Kitchen,” visit fpw.org.


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A look at gun safety after stray bullet hits 8-year-old in Garden Valley

“Every year we have a couple of people that are hit by accidental discharges,” said Boise County Sheriff’s Cpl. David Gomez.

GARDEN VALLEY, Idaho — The man charged with accidentally discharging his gun, after an 8-year-old boy in Boise County was struck by a stray bullet, is now expected in court later this month. 

The boy, named LJ, was lying in his bed Friday night, according to his dad, when a bullet from a neighbor’s gun shot through the window, a wall, and a pillow before striking the boy in his hand, face and neck. LJ is now back home and recovering. 

Prosecutors charged 41-year-old Brandon L. Nelson with injuring another by careless handling and discharge of firearms.

The incident prompted the question, how common are accidental discharges like this? 

RELATED: 8-year-old hit by stray bullet in Garden Valley: ‘He won’t be the same’

“I think every year we have a couple of accidental discharges and every year we have a couple of people that are hit by accidental discharges,” said Boise County Sheriff’s Cpl. David Gomez. “So, you want to put in as many safety mechanisms as you can. Number one, always pretend like [the gun is] loaded. Number two, keep it pointed in a safe direction always. And number three, keep it secured so that you know who’s controlling that gun.”

He added that, just like driving, it’s not good to be under the influence when operating a car and it’s not good to be under the influence and handling a gun as well because it greatly affects decision-making.

In this particular case, the parents of the 8-year-old told KTVB, Nelson was drunk when he discharged the gun Friday night. Nelson is neighbors with LJ’s dad. However, investigators have not yet released if the 41-year-old was under the

Fire safety tips | wfmynews2.com

Fire officials say cooking is the number one cause of home fires and home fire injuries. Unattended cooking is the leading cause of fires in the kitchen.

GREENSBORO, N.C. — National Fire Prevention Week runs from October 4th to October 10th. This year’s campaign is titled “Serve Up Fire Safety in the Kitchen.” It’s geared towards educating everyone about the simple but important actions they can take to keep themselves, and those around them, safe in the kitchen.

Fire Prevention Week is observed each year during the week of October 9th in commemoration of the Great Chicago Fire, which began on October 8, 1871, and caused devastating damage. The horrific conflagration killed more than 250 people, left 100,000 homeless, destroyed more than 17,400 structures, and burned more than 2,000 acres of land.

Since 1922, the National Fire Protection Association has sponsored the public observance of Fire Prevention Week. During the campaign each year, children, adults, and teachers learn how to stay safe in case of a fire. Firefighters also provide lifesaving public education in an effort to drastically decrease casualties caused by fires.

According to the NFPA, fire fighters responded to an estimated 1.3 million fires in the U.S. last year. Those fires caused roughly 3,700 deaths and more than 16,000 reported injuries. Statistics also show home fires were reported every 93 seconds. Fire officials say cooking is the number one cause of home fires and home fire injuries. Unattended cooking is the leading cause of fires in the kitchen.