Senate

Senate Republicans rip new White House coronavirus proposal

Senate Republicans on Saturday offered fierce pushback against the administration’s latest coronavirus relief proposal during a call with Treasury Secretary Steven MnuchinSteven Terner MnuchinOn The Money: Trump fuels and frustrates COVID-19 relief talks | Trump proposes .8T coronavirus relief package | Vegas ties helped Trump score M windfall in 2016 Trump fuels and frustrates COVID-19 relief talks SBA simplifies PPP forgiveness for small loans MORE and White House chief of staff Mark MeadowsMark Randall MeadowsThe Hill’s Campaign Report: Trump campaigns on Rush Limbaugh show l Democrats question Trump’s mental fitness l Coronavirus stimulus in doubt before election Debate commission co-chair: ‘No evidence whatsoever’ Trump has tested negative The Hill’s 12:30 Report: Dems ruffle feathers with POTUS fitness bill MORE.

Senate Republicans raised concerns about the $1.8 trillion price tag of the White House’s latest offer to House Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiLoeffler unveils resolution condemning Pelosi for comments on 25th Amendment On The Money: Trump fuels and frustrates COVID-19 relief talks | Trump proposes .8T coronavirus relief package | Vegas ties helped Trump score M windfall in 2016 Trump fuels and frustrates COVID-19 relief talks MORE (D-Calif.), multiple sources familiar with the call told The Hill.

One source familiar with the call said that there were “significant concerns raised with the price tag.”

“There’s an openness to continue negotiating, but the current top line is an obstacle,” the source added.

Concerns about the White House’s offer came from across the conference, underscoring the work the White House and President TrumpDonald John TrumpFederal judge shoots down Texas proclamation allowing one ballot drop-off location per county Nine people who attended Trump rally in Minnesota contracted coronavirus Schiff: If Trump wanted more infections ‘would he be doing anything different?’ MORE face to get any potential deal across the finish

White House virus aid offer is panned by Pelosi, Senate GOP

A new White House coronavirus aid has gotten bad reviews from both ends of the political spectrum

WASHINGTON — A new White House coronavirus aid offer got bad reviews from both ends of the political spectrum on Saturday.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., rejected the most generous Trump administration plan to date as “one step forward, two steps back.” The Republicans who control the Senate dismissed it as too expensive and a political loser for conservatives.

Pelosi said she is still hopeful that progress can be made toward a deal but it’s as clear as ever that GOP conservatives don’t want a deal on her terms.

“Covid Relief Negotiations are moving along. Go Big!” Trump said Friday on Twitter.

The new offer totals about $1.8 trillion, aides familiar with it said, with a key state and local fiscal relief component moving from $250 billion to at least $300 billion. The White House says its most recent offer before that was about $1.6 trillion. The aides were not authorized to publicly discuss private negotiations and spoke on condition of anonymity.

Pelosi’s most recent public offer was about $2.2 trillion, though that included a business tax increase that Republicans won’t go for.

In a letter Saturday to colleagues, Pelosi said, “This proposal amounted to one step forward, two steps back. When the president talks about wanting a bigger relief package, his

House passes revised coronavirus relief bill, but it’s unlikely to move in the Senate

The House passed a $2.2 trillion coronavirus relief bill on Thursday, as the prospects for a deal between Democrats and the White House seem to be fading.  But the bill is unlikely to move through the Republican-led Senate, as Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has indicated that he would not support any legislation that has a price tag of more than $2 trillion.

The bill passed almost entirely along party lines, with only 18 Democrats voting against it. 

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi told reporters on Thursday that Democrats and the Trump administration were still far apart on issues including funding for state and local governments, and there is “a stark difference not just of dollars, but of values.”

After discussions with Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin in recent days, Pelosi said the two also remain “way off” on a child tax credit, which Democrats want to have included in any deal. But she also said that they’re “in the ballpark” on health care provisions and assistance for small businesses.

She said that she was “hoping” the House would vote on the revised HEROES Act on Thursday but still expressed some optimism that a deal could be reached with the White House.

“Hopefully, we can find our common ground on this and do so soon,” she said, but she reiterated her argument that a smaller relief bill is not better than no bill at all.

“People say, ‘Isn’t something better than nothing?’ No, there can be an opportunity cost,” Pelosi said in her press conference, giving the example of a tax cut which Republicans would like to include in a final proposal. House members could return to their districts to campaign as soon as Thursday evening, meaning that the window to pass any legislation is closing quickly.

The revised HEROES Act is

House, Senate diverge on curbing Louisiana governor’s power

BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) — Louisiana House Republicans on Thursday started advancing multiple approaches to intervene in Gov. John Bel Edwards’ coronavirus decision-making, as disagreements emerge with the Senate on the best method of attack.

The House and Senate, in their first week of a monthlong special session, disagree over how far lawmakers should go and what’s within the limits of their constitutional authority.

Negotiations continue behind the scenes as lawmakers in the majority-Republican Legislature try to determine what can win support from both chambers — and what could get enough votes to either override Edwards’ veto or avoid the Democratic governor’s desk entirely.

The House and Governmental Affairs Committee backed bills that would require lawmakers to determine whether a governor can renew an emergency or disaster declaration after 30 days. The panel also approved a more immediate measure sponsored by House Speaker Clay Schexnayder that would jettison Edwards’ coronavirus orders for a month after the special session ends.

“It allows us to take a deep breath and see what direction we need to go in,” said Schexnayder, a Gonzales Republican.

The committee also advanced a proposal by Republican Senate President Page Cortez that received unanimous Senate support a day earlier, though some House Republicans suggested the measure does very little to address their complaints.

Cortez’s bill would require a governor to give legislative leaders advance notice and explanation when extending an emergency order — but doesn’t give lawmakers new avenues to revoke or stall the orders.

The proposals move to the full House for debate, with little clarity on what approach is gaining traction. Democrats oppose anything that would substantially chip away at Edwards’ authority.

“The governor has been well within his rights in declaring steps that we as a state need to take to protect one another,” said

CCAGW PAC Endorses Kansas Rep. Roger Marshall for Senate, and Reps. Ron Estes and Steve Watkins for Re-election to the House of Representatives

Today, the Council for Citizens Against Government Waste Political Action Committee (CCAGW PAC) announced its endorsement of Reps. Ron Estes (R-Kans.) and Steve Watkins (R-Kans.) for re-election to the House, and Rep. Roger Marshall (R-Kans.) for election to the Senate.

CCAGW PAC based its endorsements on the candidate’s’ lifetime score in CCAGW’s 2019 Congressional Ratings.

Rep. Estes was named a “Taxpayer Super Hero” in 2019 with a perfect score of 100 percent and is a lifetime “Taxpayer Hero” with a rating of 94 percent. Rep. Watkins has a lifetime rating of 99 percent based on his first year in Congress and Rep. Marshall has a lifetime rating of 87 percent, both earning the title of “Taxpayer Hero.”

“During their tenures in the House, Reps. Estes, Watkins, and Marshall have been strong and reliable votes to curb government waste and reform Washington,” said CCAGW PAC Chairman Tom Schatz. “On top of their impressive voting records, they worked with their colleagues to enact and retain historic tax cuts, support deregulation, and help ignite America’s economic boom. I urge Kansans to re-elect Reps. Estes and Watkins to the House of Representatives, and elect Rep. Marshall to the Senate.”

CCAGW PAC is affiliated with the Council for Citizens Against Government Waste, a 501(c)(4) organization. CCAGW PAC’s mission is to support political candidates who will fight to eliminate waste, fraud, and abuse in government and represent the best interests of taxpayers.

Paid for by the Council for Citizens Against Government Waste Political Action Committee. Not authorized by any candidate or candidate’s committee.

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Contacts

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