Test

After mixed messages from White House, Trump says ‘real test’ ahead in his COVID fight

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – President Donald Trump said from his hospital room on Saturday that he felt “much better” but the next few days will be “the real test” of his treatment for COVID-19, capping a day of contradictory messages from the White House about his condition.

In a four-minute video posted on Twitter, Trump, looking tired and wearing a jacket and open-necked shirt, said he “wasn’t feeling so well” when he first arrived at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on Friday.

“Over the next period of a few days, I guess that’s the real test, so we’ll be seeing what happens over those next couple of days,” Trump said, seated at a round table in front of an American flag.

The remarks came hours after differing assessments of his health from administration officials left it unclear how ill the president had become since he tested positive for COVID-19 on Thursday night, a matter of enormous public concern.

A White House team of doctors said on Saturday morning that Trump’s condition was improving and that he was already talking about returning to the White House. One doctor said Trump told them, ‘I feel like I could walk out of here today.’

Within minutes, White House chief of staff Mark Meadows gave reporters a less rosy assessment, telling them, “The president’s vitals over the last 24 hours were very concerning and the next 48 hours will be critical in terms of his care. We’re still not on a clear path to a full recovery.”

Meadows, whose initial comments were delivered on condition that he not be identified, altered his tone hours later, telling Reuters that Trump was doing “very well” and that “doctors are very pleased with his vital signs.”

Meadows did not clarify the discrepancy in his comments. A Trump

White House physician walks back a confusing timeline of Trump’s coronavirus infection that implied he was diagnosed days before announcing his test results



a man wearing a suit and tie: President Donald Trump disembarks from the Marine One helicopter followed by White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows as he arrives at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center after the White House announced that he "will be working from the presidential offices at Walter Reed for the next few days" after testing positive for the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), Joshua Roberts/Reuters


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President Donald Trump disembarks from the Marine One helicopter followed by White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows as he arrives at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center after the White House announced that he “will be working from the presidential offices at Walter Reed for the next few days” after testing positive for the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), Joshua Roberts/Reuters

White House physician Sean Conley offered a new timeline for the president’s coronavirus infection during a press briefing Saturday morning. He later walked back the statement.

Conley held the briefing to review President Donald Trump’s condition after he was hospitalized at Walter Reed Medical Center on Friday evening. The physician said Trump’s condition had improved, but he also said the president’s COVID-19 infection had been identified a day earlier than previously thought.

“Just 72 hours into the diagnosis now,” Conley said. “The first week of COVID, and in particular days 7 to 10, are the most critical in determining the likely course of this illness.”

That would mean that Trump had been diagnosed on Wednesday.

Dr. Brian Garibaldi, a physician on the team caring for the president at Walter Reed, also said that Trump had received an experimental antibody treatment “48 hours ago,” which would be roughly Thursday morning.

This was a different timeline than the one constructed by incremental statements from the White House. Trump announced his positive test results early Friday morning, and the White House disclosed his experimental antibody treatment later that day.

When asked to clarify, Conley contradicted his earlier statement.

“Thursday afternoon following the news of a close contact is when we repeated testing, and given kind of clinical indications had a little bit more concern. And that’s when late that night we got the PCR confirmation that he

At Least 8 People Test Positive For Coronavirus After Rose Garden Event For Barrett

Updated at 12:28 p.m. ET

A week ago, more than 100 people gathered in the White House Rose Garden to celebrate President Trump’s third nominee to the U.S. Supreme Court, Amy Coney Barrett. Guests mingled, hugged and kissed on the cheek, most without wearing masks. An indoor reception followed the outdoor ceremony.

Seven days later, at least eight people who attended the ceremony have tested positive for the coronavirus, including the president. Several more of the president’s closest aides and advisers have also tested positive.

The president and first lady

President Trump, first lady Melania Trump and Judge Amy Coney Barrett walk into the Rose Garden for last Saturday’s nomination announcement. The first couple have since tested positive for the coronavirus. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

President Trump announced early Friday that he and first lady Melania Trump had tested positive. In introducing Barrett and pledging a swift confirmation in the Senate, the Trump campaign appeared to be finally making progress toward shifting the focus of the campaign away from the coronavirus.

Less than a week later, the president would fly to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center for treatment after his own diagnosis. Barrett tested negative on Friday.

Kellyanne Conway

Kellyanne Conway and Attorney General William Barr talk with guests in the Rose Garden. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Trump’s now former senior adviser sat in the front row. She tested positive on Friday and said her symptoms are mild. Conway also reportedly participated in debate preparations inside the White House later in the week.

Mike Lee

Sen. Mike Lee, R-Utah, and his wife, Sharon Lee, walk into the Rose Garden on Saturday. The senator tested positive five days later. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Sen. Mike Lee announced a positive test result on Friday. He was seen hugging and kissing other guests and not

Trump Hospitalized With COVID-19, Others in White House Test Positive

Illustration for article titled Rona in the White House: Trump Hospitalized With COVID-19 Symptoms Amid Indications Rose Garden Ceremony Was Superspreader Event

Photo: Drew Angerer (Getty Images)

Since news broke on Friday that President Trump and his first lady Melania have tested positive for COVID-19, the situation with the president seems to have rapidly developed—or at least the administration’s public acknowledgment of the reality of coronavirus.

On Friday night, the White House announced that Trump has been hospitalized at the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center for treatment of his coronavirus symptoms, which include fatigue, reports The Washington Post.

Before heading off to Walter Reed, Trump posted a short video on Twitter in which he says he “thinks he’s doing very well.” Meanwhile, Trump’s doctor at the White House revealed that he started the president on a suite of drugs aimed at treating the deadly coronavirus.

From WaPo:

Trump, who is 74, began taking a cocktail of drugs as a “precautionary measure,” according to doctor Sean Conley, who provided only limited information about Trump’s condition or the reasons for his extended stay at Walter Reed.

“In addition to the polyclonal antibodies, the President has been taking zinc, vitamin D, famotidine, melatonin and a daily aspirin,” Conley said in a White House memo Friday afternoon, describing Trump as “fatigued but in good spirits.”

Conley said Trump received an 8-gram dose of Regeneron’s polyclonal antibody cocktail via “infusion without incident.”

While the White House says Trump will stay in hospital and “work” from there for several days, coronavirus continues to reverberate through members of his administration and others in its orbit, putting a pandemic-sized wrench in his campaigning (which for the most part has been taking place in seeming defiance of the very real threat of COVID-19).

Trump’s campaign manager Bill Stepien revealed on Friday that he has also tested positive for coronavirus, reports Politico

At Least 7 People Test Positive For Coronavirus After Rose Garden Event For Barrett

A week ago, more than 100 people gathered in the White House Rose Garden to celebrate President Trump’s third nominee to the U.S. Supreme Court, Amy Coney Barrett. Guests mingled, hugged and kissed on the cheek, most without wearing masks. An indoor reception followed the outdoor ceremony.

Seven days later, at least seven people who attended the ceremony have tested positive for the coronavirus, including the president. Several more of the president’s closest aides and advisors have also tested positive.

The president and first lady

President Trump announced early Friday that he and first lady Melania Trump had tested positive. In introducing Judge Barrett and pledging a swift confirmation in the Senate, the Trump campaign was finally making progress toward shifting the focus of the campaign away from the coronavirus.

Less than a week later, the president would fly to Walter Reed Medical Center for treatment after his own diagnosis. Barrett tested negative on Friday.

Kellyanne Conway

Trump’s now former senior adviser sat in the front row. She tested positive on Friday and said her symptoms are mild. Conway also reportedly participated in debate preparations inside the White House later in the week.

Mike Lee

Sen. Mike Lee, R-Utah, received a positive test result on Friday. He was seen hugging and kissing other guests and not wearing a mask at the event.

The Utah Republican is also a member of the Senate Judiciary Committee and met with Judge Barrett later in the week, again without masks. Lee says he will isolate for 10 days.

Thom Tillis

Sen. Thom Tillis, R-N.C., also received a positive test on Friday. Republican members of the Senate Judiciary Committee attended the Saturday announcement. Tillis wore a mask during the ceremony, but several of his colleagues did not.

Tillis later participated in a Senate debate in