Times

Kitchen Garden: Nature’s buzzing along Dairy Road | The Canberra Times

whats-on, susan parsons, susan parsons kitchen garden, jerrabomberra wetlands

This week the kitchen garden meets nature. First stop Jerrabomberra Wetlands (hat, boots and water bottle recommended). From the car park walk into the first bird hide called Ardea (a genus of herons). It is dark and quiet and we watch a pair of ducks bobbing their heads as they swim (spring flirting) and a pair of masked lapwings on an islet in Kelly’s Swamp. From the next hide a couple with binoculars point out shoveler ducks with three ducklings. A quad of pelicans do a fly past. The sound of church bells is drowned out in the sunken frog-watch area where water is a centimetre below metal gratings. Something is splashing around in this reach of the Molonglo, an Australian water rat, a carp or maybe a platypus. The area where you walk between reeds as high as your shoulders is particularly alluring. Driving along Dairy Road there is a burst of colour. Canberra City Farm is a partner with Floriade: Reimagained and vibrant poppies, tulips and pansies, well mulched, line the fence. Christine Vincent was the Floriade team leader from CCF with four female assistants for the planting plus two males who did bed preparation and mowing. From the gates of the City Farm you can compare Canberra red clay soil with beds black with compost. Broad beans are surrounded by a rosemary hedge and bright orange calendulas. One plot is filled with huge artichoke plants and massed borage, hundreds of bees buzzing its blue flowers. People can walk in through the wetland gateways but, because of COVID restrictions, twice weekly opportunities have been set up for interested people to visit on supervised tours. You can book on [email protected] for a one-hour tour on Monday or Thursday mornings. The

White House spokesman refuses to answer when Trump’s last negative COVID-19 test was 6 times in one interview



a person wearing a suit and tie: White House spokesman Brian Morgenstern appeared on MSNBC's Live With Hallie Jackson on Friday. Screenshot via MSNBC


© Screenshot via MSNBC
White House spokesman Brian Morgenstern appeared on MSNBC’s Live With Hallie Jackson on Friday. Screenshot via MSNBC

  • White House spokesman Brian Morgenstern refused to disclose when President Donald Trump last tested negative for COVID-19 at least six times in one interview.
  • “You are very focused on looking backwards,” Morgenstern told MSNBC correspondent Hallie Jackson. 
  • Morgenstern’s interview is part of a pattern of the White House refusing to reveal the president’s last negative test.
  • The last time Trump or anyone in the White House was on the record regarding a negative test wasMay 21.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The White House is still refusing to reveal the last time President Donald Trump tested negative for COVID-19, increasing confusion around the timeline of his infection and anyone else potentially exposed to the virus by the president.

Trump spokesman Brian Morgenstern dodged answering the question at least six times during an appearance on MSNBC’s “Live With Hallie Jackson” on Friday.

“The president shares a great deal of information with the American public,” he told Jackson, citing HIPAA as to why he cannot disclose Trump’s last negative test, though Trump could waive his HIPAA rights.

Moments earlier, he said he would reveal the results of Trump’s most recent test.

“What’s the difference? Why not be more transparent?” Jackson pushed back.

“It’s not something that has the public health value that the other information we’re releasing does,” Morgenstern said. “That’s why we’re releasing information in the interest of public health.”

“I think medical experts would absolutely disagree with that about the public health value,” Jackson responded.

Public health experts and epidemiologists uniformly say that knowledge of Trump’s infection timeline is helpful for contract tracing matters and to better understand how long the president could be infectious. Since

White House spokesperson evades answering when Trump last tested negative 6 times in 1 interview

The White House really doesn’t want to reveal last time President Trump tested negative for COVID-19.

While the White House insists Trump first tested positive for the coronavirus a week ago, late on Oct. 1, that test only came after he had reportedly been showing symptoms of the virus. Reporters have since been trying and failing to get an answer on just when Trump last tested negative, including MSNBC’s Hallie Jackson, who pressed White House Deputy Press Secretary Brian Morgenstern six times for an answer on Friday.

When Jackson first asked for the date of Trump’s last test, Morgenstern first insisted he didn’t know, to which Jackson questioned if he’d even asked for an answer. Jackson then reminded him there is public health value to this question, as knowing when Trump was last testing negative could help pinpoint when he was infected and who he could’ve spread it to. And when Jackson asked if Trump had at least tested negative for the virus before debating Democratic nominee Joe Biden last week, Morgenstern echoed Trump’s doctor Sean Conley in telling Jackson she was “very focused in looking backwards.” After her final attempt, when Morgenstern implored Jackson to talk about something else, she shut the interview down.

More stories from theweek.com
Mike Pence was the unlikely winner of the vice presidential debate
The myth of Mike Pence’s appeal
Trump is shockingly bad at this

Source Article

Power Up: A VP debate for the times: Pence and Harris face off as White House coronavirus outbreak expands

All this makes the stakes especially high for Vice President Pence, 61, and Sen. Kamala Harris, 55, who will face off tonight for the first time to defend the policies and records of their candidates. These are some key measures of success for both sides, according to sources close to both campaigns: 

Can Pence spin the White House coronavirus outbreak that infected at least 18 people in contact with Trump? 

Trump’s No. 2 – and head of the White House coronavirus task force – will almost certainly be forced to address the outbreak that’s ensnared the president, along with the administration’s handling of the pandemic that has killed nearly 210,000 people in the United States. “Pence’s challenge is to explain what happened in the last few days and defend it,a Trump campaign source told Power Up.

  • You wonder why [Trump’s] numbers with seniors are hurting? You have to show you care,” the source said. “There’s probably a way to get them back because they probably don’t want to vote for Biden but they want Trump to acknowledge that he gets it.”
  • Still, some questions could be nearly impossible for Pence to answer – namely, the potential exposure of Trump’s supporters: “I can basically defend anything about the White House and coronavirus except for them allowing Trump to go to Bedminster – I’m sorry but there is no good spin on that specific point,” the source added.
  • Trump mingled with more than 200 people at his New Jersey golf club last Thursday, hours before he tested positive – and after knowing he was exposed to the virus.

Will Pence – and the Trump team – take more safety precautions at the debate this time? 

Trump’s family was criticized for taking off their masks at least week’s presidential debate.

White House is not tracing contacts of guests and staff at Rose Garden event 10 days ago: New York Times

MARKET PULSE

The White House has decided not to trace the contacts of guests and staff members at a Rose Garden event 10 days ago for Judge Amy Coney Barrett, where at least eight people, including President Donald Trump, may have been infected, the New York Times reported, citing a White House official familiar with the plans. Instead, it is limiting efforts to notifying people who came into close contact with Trump the two days before he tested positive on Thursday evening, the paper reported. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which has had a contact tracing team ready, has been cut out of the process. The White House official said the White House is following CDC guidelines that recommend focusing on contacts within a two-day window from diagnosis. But health experts said it was irresponsible to ignore the earlier event. “You cannot argue against the fact that five or six people who attended that event all got infected, unless you argue that that was all random chance,” Dr. Yvonne Maldonado, an epidemiologist and contact tracing expert told the Times. “There were a lot of people working at that event, and so they need to be contact tracing that whole event.” Health experts have lamented the U.S. failure to conduct the contact tracing, isolation and quarantine procedures that have helped some countries and regions contain the spread of the deadly illness.

Loading...

Load Error

Continue Reading

Source Article