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Kitchen Garden: When life gives you lemons | The Canberra Times

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Following reference to a peach tree grown from a seed by Betty Cornhill and still producing a good crop of peaches in the Canberra Organic Growers’ Society garden now named after her in Curtin, Sue McCarthy of O’Connor said the photo of the tree by Minh Chu (Kitchen Garden, September 22) “resonates with me because, just like Betty Cornhill, all of us gardeners have limited time to leave a more lasting impact. Trees do that.” In a local nursery recently a young man from Downer was consulting a book while looking at trees for sale. His choice was between the tulip tree (liriodendron tulipifera) and the sugar maple (acer saccharum). Both need extra water in Canberra and tulip trees suffer from hot winds. There is a sugar maple forest at the National Arboretum planted in 2009. The sap from mature trees is used for making Canadian maple syrup. Original property owners in this district often planted bunya pines (araucaria bidwillii) near their homesteads. There is also a bunya forest at the Arboretum, historic trees at Lanyon homestead, one on the corner of Kings Avenue, another in Weston Park’s English Garden. In March, below a tree near the gates to the Australian National Botanic Gardens was a fallen cone with its edible seeds. On September 23 in a letter to The Canberra Times, a woman from Belconnen wrote, “What blissful rain washing the stench of our flowering plum trees out of the air. A pity we missed the hail, it might have knocked their flowers off as well. Why do we continue to plant these trees which smell of rotting fish in so many Canberra streets?” Do flowering plum trees have an unpleasant smell? I have not noticed it. The blossoms have been

6 Times You Should Not DIY a Home Improvement Project

HGTV makes everyone feel as if they’re only a couple of power tools away from being home renovation masters. But don’t be fooled. There’s a reason building and construction trades are considered skilled jobs.



a woman wearing a blue dress


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Tackling a home renovation project requires more than an eye for design and the ability to match colors. You also need to understand how the various parts of a structure fit together, and you may even have to (gasp) do some math.

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What’s more, a home improvement project done wrong can be expensive to fix, or even dangerous. Before you end up with a DIY disaster, here are six times when you should probably call in a pro.

It’s not the usual blah, blah, blah. Click here to sign up for our free newsletter.

1. You don’t understand what you’re doing

Yes, this seems so obvious, doesn’t it? And yet, some people try to do projects when they don’t understand the mechanics. Perhaps they mistakenly think it will all simply fall into place once they get a bit further into the project.

Don’t assume project instructions will make sense later. Know what you’re doing right from the start. Otherwise, you won’t be able to identify potential problems as they arise. Or worse, you could get halfway through and find you can’t finish.

The same thing goes for tools, especially power tools. If you don’t know how to use something, maybe you shouldn’t be using it.

Failing to heed this advice could result in shoddy work or personal injury. Neither is a good outcome for a DIY project.

2. Someone knowledgeable advises you to get a pro

Maybe you go to the hardware store, explain the project, and the workers raise their eyebrows and say, “Really?”

When someone familiar with

Covid-19 News: Live Updates – The New York Times

Credit…Pete Kiehart for The New York Times

While families across the United States this summer were on edge about the coming school year, top White House officials were pressuring the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to play down the risk of sending children back to school, according to documents and interviews with current and former government officials.

The effort included an attempt to find alternate data showing that the coronavirus pandemic was weakening and posed little danger to children — a strikingly political intervention in one of the most sensitive public health debates of the pandemic.

A member of Vice President Mike Pence’s staff said she was repeatedly asked by Marc Short, the vice president’s chief of staff, to get the C.D.C. to produce more reports and charts showing a decline in coronavirus cases among young people.

Mr. Short dispatched junior members of the vice president’s staff to circumvent the C.D.C. in search of data he thought may better support the White House’s position, said Olivia Troye, the aide, who has since resigned.

In another instance, Dr. Deborah L. Birx, the White House’s coronavirus response coordinator, pushed the C.D.C. to incorporate a document from a mental health agency inside the Department of Health and Human Services that warned school closures would have a long-term effect on the mental health of children and that asymptomatic children were unlikely to spread the virus.

Scientists at the C.D.C. pointed out numerous errors in the document and raised concerns that it appeared to minimize the risk of the coronavirus to school-age children, according to an edited version of the document

Trump, WH blend denials, justifications in reaction to New York Times story on taxes

While President Donald Trump’s initial reaction to the New York Times’ bombshell report that he paid little to no federal income taxes over nearly two decades was to dismiss it outright as “totally fake news,” his defense has since evolved into defense of tax-avoidance practices.



a man wearing a suit and tie: President Donald Trump speaks to reporters during a news conference inside the James S. Brady Briefing Room at the White House, Sept. 27, 2020, in Washington.


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President Donald Trump speaks to reporters during a news conference inside the James S. Brady Briefing Room at the White House, Sept. 27, 2020, in Washington.

In a series of tweets Monday morning, the president attacked the Times for “bringing up my Taxes & all sorts of other nonsense with illegally obtained information” and argued he was “entitled” to what he claimed.

“I paid many millions of dollars in taxes but was entitled, like everyone else, to depreciation & tax credits,” Trump tweeted, defending how much he has paid in taxes without directly challenging the specific numbers raised by the Times.

But he did not answer reporters’ shouted questions at a Rose Garden event Monday afternoon.

The paper denies Trump’s tax information was obtained illegally. ABC News has not independently verified the Times’ account.



Donald Trump wearing a suit and tie: President Donald Trump speaks on COVID-19 testing in the Rose Garden of the White House, Sept. 28, 2020.


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President Donald Trump speaks on COVID-19 testing in the Rose Garden of the White House, Sept. 28, 2020.

In a story published Sunday, the newspaper reported that the president paid just $750 in federal income tax the year he was elected and that same amount during his first year in office. The Times also found that he paid no federal income tax at all in 11 of the 18 years of information they examined.

Trump is the only president in modern history not to release his tax returns and could resolve the lingering questions about his taxes once and for all by simply releasing the information voluntarily. But instead, Trump has