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Kristin Cavallari’s New Kitchen Pantry Is Every Type-A Organizer’s Dream Come True

From Delish

Kristin Cavallari gave us a tour of her brand new home kitchen and her pantry, and the items she keeps around are perfect for cooking, baking, and snacking. The Very Cavallari star has plans to change some things around in her new space since she just moved in about three months ago, but so far everything looks like an absolute dream.

The main alteration Kristin hopes to make for her kitchen is turning the stovetop into a full stove range so she can have another oven in her space. She cooks every day, so the extra space would be helpful when she prepares meals. Kristin also makes it a point to leave some things out and about her space.

“I love when kitchens look lived in because that’s real life so I always kind of have stuff out,” she said as she showed off the countertop next to the stove. This is where she keeps olive oil, coconut oil, pink Himalayan salt, truffle salt, a copper tea kettle, and a her Dutch oven.

Her pantry is one of her favorite spots, though, and there’s even a ladder so she can reach the top of her shelves for whatever she needs. There’s a sweetener section where she keeps everything from maple syrup to real honeycomb (the latter of which she likes to add to charcuterie boards). Right beside that, Kristin keeps her vitamins and minerals, chickpea and buckwheat pasta, and black rice.

Things you’ll never find in her pantry include white salt, white sugar, and white flour Instead, she’ll cook with substitutes like oat or coconut flour and natural sweeteners. One of her favorite alternatives is the Birch Benders paleo banana pancakes. Kristin likes to cook with these sorts of ingredients and keeps a lot of her meals gluten-free,

New Vietnamese restaurant is immigrant cook’s dream come true


Meet the family behind Yen’s Kitchen in suburban Lake Worth

Liz Balmaseda
 
| Palm Beach Post

Years before Manh Trac was born in Ho Chi Minh City, his mother performed at the local circus, balancing her petite frame upon spinning barrels. She had terrible motion sickness, but she also had six siblings to help feed. So if it took some daredevil stunts to accomplish that, so be it. 

When that wasn’t enough, Yen Nguyen learned to cook. She set up a lunch stand in an industrial neighborhood and sold steaming bowls of her homemade noodle soups to factory workers on break. Her long-simmered beef pho and pork-broth soups picked up a following. Soon she had a food cart to roll into the local zoo, where she could sell bags of homemade Vietnamese street snacks to visiting families. 

When her son was born, she moved the food enterprise to her front porch. At 25, Manh Trac tells that story as if he witnessed all of it himself, with details so vivid you can taste the chili oil in his mother’s popular spicy beef vermicelli bowls. 

He tells the story today from Yen’s Kitchen, the bright, month-old restaurant his mother opened in a suburban Lake Worth plaza that’s home to three churches, a pizzeria and a new-ish Asian market. Manh may be standing a world away from that front-porch stand of their native Vietnam, but the scents and flavors of their homeland surround him in the small, casual eatery. 

“Everything you see here is made by my mother,” says Manh, referring to the neat shelves of street snacks and spices his mom makes and packages. “We’re just her supporters.”

A hand-painted mural lights up a wall with a sign that translates to “Second Sister of Saigon” — it’s a popular Vietnamese movie

True Food Kitchen brings healthy menu to Easton

Gary Seman Jr.
 |  For The Columbus Dispatch

The proliferation of upscale healthy food restaurants shows that a good portion of the dining public won’t hold its nose at plant-based dishes and is even willing to pay top dollar for them.

True Food Kitchen, the latest to join the central Ohio sphere of natural-foods’ restaurants, offers a balance of “healthy and delicious,” said Christine Barone, CEO of the Phoenix-based restaurant chain.

“It has to start with delicious because food is one of life’s greatest pleasures,” Barone said. “It has to be a sense of discovery and a real experience.”

True Food Kitchen, 4052 Worth Ave. in Easton Town Center, has a sleek, modern look, with a verdant color scheme, spacious dining room, light wood paneling stacked up to the towering ceiling, and mix of low- and high-top tables. A retractable wall opens to the year-round patio.

Columbus is the 35th location of True Food Kitchen, whose founder is Dr. Andrew Weil, a diet guru and specialist of “integrative medicine,” the restaurant’s website said.

Founded in 2008, it was serious about sourcing good ingredients, Barone said.

“I think at the beginning it was kind of niche,” she said. “Organic kale was hard to find.”

Although “organic” is not the byword at True Food Kitchen; its menu is influenced by sustainability and the Environmental Working Group – a nonprofit group that publishes reports on more naturally grown food, and those that are cultivated with the use of pesticides – among other initiatives, Barone said.

The menu, while not fully vegetarian or vegan, is veggie-centric with dishes such as jackfruit lettuce wraps, ancient-grains bowl and charred cauliflower.

The menu changes seasonally and the sauces and dressings are made in-house, Barone said.

Of the meat dishes, the kitchen features lasagna Bolognese with fennel chicken