Trump

Trump tests negative for COVID-19, is not infectious

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – U.S. President Donald Trump has tested negative for COVID-19 and he is not infectious to others, the White House physician said on Monday, 10 days after Trump announced he had contracted the coronavirus.

In a memo released by the White House just hours before Trump was due to resume holding campaign rallies, Dr. Sean Conley said the president had tested negative on consecutive days using an Abbott Laboratories <ABT.N> BinaxNOW antigen card.

Conley said the negative tests and other clinical and laboratory data “indicate a lack of detectable viral replication.”

Trump’s medical team had determined that based on the data and guidelines from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention “the president is not infectious to others,” Conley said.

Trump returns to the campaign trail on Monday night with a rally in Sanford, Florida, his first since he disclosed on Oct. 2 that he tested positive for COVID-19.

Critics fault Trump for failing to encourage supporters at campaign events, and even White House staff, to wear protective masks and abide by social-distancing guidelines. At least 11 close Trump aides have tested positive for the coronavirus.

(Reporting by Eric Beech; Editing by Chris Reese and Bill Berkrot)

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Trump Holds Florida Rally After White House Physician Reports Negative COVID-19 Tests

On Monday, White House physician Sean Conley said that President Trump had registered consecutive days in which he’s tested negative for COVID-19. The news came on the same date that Trump headed to a packed campaign rally in Sanford, Florida. 

“In response to your inquiry regarding the President’s most recent COVID-19 tests, I can share with you that he has tested NEGATIVE, on consecutive days, using the Abbott BinaxNOW antigen card,” said Conley. He added that those tests occurred “in context with additional clinical and laboratory data.”

Speaking of this data, Conley wrote that it was made up of “viral load, subgenomic RNA and PCR cycle threshold measurements, as well as ongoing assessment of viral culture data.”

The letter concluded that the president is “not infectious to others,” which echoes a similar message that Conley issued on Saturday. He also stated, on Saturday, that the president is cleared for an “active schedule.” 

CNN adds that it’s not clear what consecutive days Trump tested positive, while also noting that the Abbott BinaxNOW test he reportedly took may lack precision, as it’s only proven accurate in people being tested within the first week of their symptoms starting to show. The FDA has also said they’re not certain of how accurate Abbott BinaxNOW results are. 

Trump’s positive test was first announced on Thursday, October 1. The White House has not said when the president last tested negative prior to that announcement. 

As for that aforementioned rally, a large crowd gathered for the event. The campaign was issuing temperature checks and distributed masks/hand sanitizer, but social distancing remained absent. 

Has Trump Recovered From COVID-19? White House Physician Gives Assessment

President Donald Trump has tested negative for COVID-19 “on consecutive days,” White House physician Dr. Sean Conley stated Monday in a written note. The memo was released just hours before Trump planned to appear in Sanford, Florida.

Trump’s negative diagnosis came from using the Abbott antigen test. Conley said Trump is not contagious to others. 

Trump announced he tested positive for COVID-19 on Oct. 2, along with first lady Melania Trump. He then spent a weekend at Walter Reed Medical Center following the diagnosis, where he received multiple treatments for the virus.

Trump has been treated with an antibody cocktail from Regeneron and remdesivir. He was also treated with the steroid dexamethasone.

Trump has said contracting COVID-19 was a “blessing from God.” He also recently told Americans to not let COVID-19 “dominate your life.”

Trump has told his campaign to hold events every day until the election on Nov. 3. Dr. Anthony Fauci, the nation’s top epidemiologist, said Trump’s rallies are “asking for trouble” as attendees often do not wear masks or social distance.

Democratic nominee Joe Biden has criticized Trump, saying he bears some responsibility for his COVID-19 infection. At the same time, the former vice president has said he is praying for Trump’s recovery. 

Multiple other figures in the Trump campaign and administration have tested positive for the virus in recent weeks. Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany, campaign manager Bill Stepien, former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and three Republican senators are a few high-profile individuals to have been infected by the virus. 

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Trump tests negative for Covid-19 on consecutive days, White House doctor says

Ahead of his first campaign rally since being hospitalized for Covid-19, President Donald Trump’s White House physician Dr. Sean Conley released a memo on Monday stating the president had recently tested negative on consecutive days and is no longer contagious.

Trump and the administration have repeatedly dodged questions about when the president last tested negative for the virus. Conley said in his memo a number of measures were used to test Trump and that he had tested negative on antigen tests instead of the more conclusive polymerase chain reaction test. Conley did not say on which days Trump tested negative.

“This comprehensive data, in concert with the CDC’s guidelines for removal of transmission-based precautions, have informed our medical team’s assessment that the President is not infectious to others,” Conley said in the memo.

The news comes as Trump returns to the campaign trail Monday night with a rally in Florida after he and several White House and campaign aides were infected with Covid-19. Florida is a crucial battleground state and polls show that Joe Biden, the Democratic nominee, is leading Trump. Trump won the state in 2016.

“They say I’m immune. I feel so powerful,” Trump told the crowd in Sanford. “I’ll walk into that audience, I’ll walk in there, kiss everyone in that audience. I’ll kiss the guys and the beautiful women.”

Biden on Monday held events in Ohio, another battleground state. Vice President Mike Pence was also campaigning in Ohio on Monday. However, Sen. Kamala D. Harris, D-Calif., Biden’s running mate, was not on the trail on Monday, participating instead as a member of the Senate Judiciary Committee in the confirmation hearing of Judge Amy Coney Barrett, Trump’s nominee to the Supreme Court.

Trump spent much of the day ranting on Twitter about health care and other issues

Trump Tests Negative for Coronavirus, White House Doctor Says

President Trump has tested negative for the coronavirus “on consecutive days,” according to White House physician Dr. Sean Conley.

In a memo to White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany posted on Twitter Monday evening, shortly before Trump’s first scheduled campaign rally since receiving a positive diagnosis, Conley said the president is “not infectious to others.”

“In response to your inquiry regarding the President’s most recent COVID-19 tests, I can share with you that he has tested NEGATIVE, on consecutive days, using the Abbott BinaxNOW antigen card,” Conley wrote. “It is important to note that this test was not used in isolation for the determination of the President’s current negative status.”

He continued: “Repeatedly negative antigen tests, taken in context with additional clinical and laboratory data, including viral load, subgeneric RNA, and PCR style threshold measurements, as well as an ongoing assessment of viral culture data, all indicate a lack of detectable viral replication.”

“This comprehensive data, in concert with the CDC’s guidelines for removal of transmission-based precautions, have informed our medical team’s assessment that the President is not infectious to others,” Conley said.

On Saturday, Conley said in a memo that Trump was no longer contagious, but had not clarified whether or not the president had tested negative for the coronavirus.

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